It’s a new dawn, it’s a new day, it’s some new DMC, and I’m feelin’ good!

New DMC Colors ChartBig news, stitchers! DMC, one of the most popular cross stitch embroidery thread manufacturers, has just released 35 new colors! Yeah, it’s like Christmas in November! Crikey, it’s like Christmas in November! It’s November, for floss’s sake! I’d better start stitching and knitting! Who’s idea was it to start blogging every day in November? Oh, yeah, that was me.

The new flosses are all numbered from 01 to 35, which is a little weird to me, since I’m used to my DMC floss coming in numbers of three and four digits only, but I think I’ll adjust (that’s a joke, by the way). They are not replacing any of the old colors, just adding new ones, which brings the total DMC collection to 500 even. And, yes, I have every one. And, soon, these will be mine too. Oh, yes, they will.

New DMC Colors 2017
And you can even get them in a super cute gold box!

These are the first new colors in four years, which is great, but I’m still getting used to the old colors and I can probably count on one hand the number of patterns featuring  the 2013 colors that I’ve stitched since their release. By the way, in researching this blog post, I found it extremely difficult to follow the trail of new and discontinued DMC colors. In particular, it was frustrating that the DMC site doesn’t have a master list somewhere. Are you listening, DMC?

In fact, until I started poking around to write this post, I didn’t even realize that some of their colors had been discontinued several years ago. Mercifully, I found this handy-dandy chart on someone else’s site (sadly, I now can’t find the site again or I would definitely give credit where credit is due — you, sir or madam, are a beacon of light in the darkness, and grateful stitchers everywhere thank you for your service):

 

New Number Color Name Old Number Old Color Name
3813
Blue Green, Light
504
Blue Green, Very Light
732
Olive Green
731
Olive Green, Dark
3326
Rose, Light
776
Pink, Medium
782
Topaz, Dark
781
Topaz, Very Dark
3760
Wedgewood, Medium
806
Peacock Blue, Dark
740
Tangerine
971
Pumpkin
407
Desert Sand, Dark
3773
Desert Sand, Medium

But back to the latest additions… In short, while all new colors are welcome, the new set makes three great contributions to the DMC line-up that are worth pointing out:

  • there’s a nice set of grays that don’t have a purple (or any other color) tinge to them. Just a straightforward mix of white and black. Anastasia Steele would approve.
  • there are more options in the purple range, particularly reddish-purples
  • there are now many more yellowy-green and greeny-yellow options. Although why they needed to add another shade of “Nile green” (whatever that is), I’ll never know. I think I’ve had my skeins of 561-564 and 954 since far back into the last millennium and never ever used them. Oh wait, there was that one disastrous Chinese dragon project. What the hell was I thinking? (I was young, it was the eighties, and the the color wheel hadn’t been invented yet).
Chinese Dragon Cross Stitch
Clearly, we hadn’t heard of the iron either.

I’m also fond of the new mocha browns and the oranges (because, you know, pumpkins), although they do remind me of some of the old colorways. In particular, the browns remind me of the 838-842 range, but then, those have always been some of my favorite browns, so OK. (Full disclosure: like every other stitcher in North America, I am still awaiting my very own set of the new colors, so I am writing this post based on the pics on the interwebs).

A more thorough and informed discussion of all the new colors is available (from someone who has seen the threads in person) on Lord Libidan’s blog. I’ve been out of the cross stitch loop for a while now, so I wasn’t familiar with Lord Libidan, but I will definitely be following his work from now on even though  He is, according to Mr. X Stitch, the “Jedi master of video game cross stitch.” I love that many of his designs create 3D robots and Transformers and lots of other characters I don’t know precisely because I’m not a member of the gaming community (I have enough trouble keeping up with the communities I am a member of). However, you don’t have to be a gamer to know that cross stitch desperately needs an infusion of youthfulness and trendiness in order to thrive in the same way that knitting and other crafts have been.

Cross stitch finishing, of course, has always had an element of 3D (ornaments come instantly to mind), which brings me to an uncomfortable final thought: I wish more contemporary female designers were getting the kind of attention garnered by these two “manbroiderers”  [Yeah: no granny count! Yuck: why do men need their own special label anyway?]. Seriously, I looked. But I will save my extended thoughts on this subject for a later post. After all, winter is coming and the long, dark night of NaBloWriMo is full of terrors.

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2 thoughts on “It’s a new dawn, it’s a new day, it’s some new DMC, and I’m feelin’ good!

  1. Um, weren’t guild embroiderers historically men? Is that the future post? I do believe I got into it once with the manbroiderer extraordinaire over the lack of historical understanding. But he’s had a ted talk, and I write to 40 people. Whatevs.

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    1. I think you and I are actually on the same page here and I’d really like to hear more about your exchange with the manbroiderer extraordinaire. My point was not that men shouldn’t or couldn’t do embroidery (or any other craft for that matter) either now or in the past, but that the “manbroiderers” seem to be treated with a little more professional respect than the just plain embroiderers, most of whom happen to be women. Lord Libidan was given a set of DMC flosses in advance to review, but I looked all over the web for female bloggers who were accorded the same professional courtesy (I’m not counting designers here, because I assume many of them were sent advance sets, but just didn’t blog about it). It’s that icky phenomenon where men entering a predominantly female milieu are often fawned over, while women entering a predominantly male one are often ostracized or harassed.

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